Bamboo Treadle Pump (Ayse Ozbay)

ImageBamboo Treadle Pump is a human-powered device that is used to obtain groundwater to use for agriculture during dry season. Pushing the treadles up and down gets the mechanism moving and draws water to the surface. The pump is made from bamboo – or other inexpensive material –  and two metal cylinders with pistons, which can be manufactured locally at metal workshops. This is an inexpensive and efficient solution to water problems that may arise in certain parts of the world during dry season. The Bamboo Treadle Pump has been immensely used in various countries such as Bangladesh, Nepal, Cambodia and India. It releases farmer’s dependency on rain-fed irrigation. Over 1.7 million has been sold in the world with great results. Just in Bangladesh, the pump has generated 1.4 billion dollars in farmers’ net income.

In my opinion, agriculture is very important in the progression of the world. Not only does it provide people with food, but it also generates income. In some countries of the world, lack of agriculture can lead to poverty and famine. Bamboo Treadle Pump helps people cultivate crops more easily and efficiently and gives them control over their own income. With this simple technology, people are no longer dependent on rain. It is also a very affordable way to get to fresh water. It doesn’t require electricity or any other energy source. These pumps can be made locally; so they provide income not only to the farmers but also to the people who own metal workshops or who sell bamboo.

The design is very simple: two pistons, some bamboo and pedals that go up and down. It’s great to know that something so simple can change the lives of many people in a positive. The success of this device is evident in the revenue it provided for the farmers in Bangladesh. Bamboo Tread Pump promotes social change for it advances agriculture in various parts of the world.

Links:

http://designother90.org/solution/bamboo-treadle-pump/

http://www.ideorg.org/OurTechnologies/TreadlePump.aspx

http://www.fao.org/docrep/W7314E/w7314e0u.htm

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